See, Hear, Speak , Touch - The Main Categories of Learning by UK Educational Furniture, 16/06/16

See, Hear, Speak , Touch - The Main Categories of Learning
Research has shown that we all use various senses to learn, and this is what forms the basis of the Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic (VAK) learning style, but what exactly is this?
Here is a guide to the VAK learning style, along with ways that school classrooms can be modified to suit it better.

Research has shown that we all use various senses to learn, and this is what forms the basis of the Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic (VAK) learning style, but what exactly is this?

Here is a guide to the VAK learning style, along with ways that school classrooms can be modified to suit it better.

VAK stands for Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic, which are the three sensory receivers that we all use to learn. Tactile is also added sometimes, and the name is changed to VAKT.

Learners use all three modalities to learn new information and new experiences, but one of these is often dominant. It is this dominant modality that defines which way is the best for an individual to learn something.

As a rule, information should be presented using all three of these styles so that all of the learners can enjoy the benefits of greater involvement because they each have a preferred way of learning. So how can you adapt your classroom accordingly?

There are many changes that you can make to your classroom in order to adapt it for the different styles of learning. By doing this, you can help all of the students to get the most from the experience by getting access to their preferred learning style.

Visual learners tend to learn best through images, written language and reading. They are good at remembering something even after reading it once, and they enjoy watching lectures rather than just listening to them. They also like to use their imaginations to visualise people and things.

You can integrate this into the classroom by adding more visual aids, illustrations, screens
and displays
, and charts around the room, especially those that relate to subjects you have studied, and by providing students with handouts and outlines before the lesson. You may also want to encourage them to use drawing and illustrations when making notes.

You could set up the classroom in such a way that the students can watch you present information on the board or watch a TV, and you may want to arrange classroom chairs
in a horse-shoe style.

Auditory learners tend to prefer reading aloud rather than to themselves. They like to talk and listen to conversations. You can help them by providing an introduction when you start on new material, and using a summary at the end. You can then ask questions during the presentation to keep them engaged.

They like brainstorming in groups, so set the classroom tables up in groups to encourage more interaction rather than having the desks lined up in rows.

Kinesthetic learners enjoy moving and touching as they learn, and they lose concentration when there is no movement. They like taking notes simply to move their hands, and they often use highlighters in theirnotes and draw diagrams to help them take in the information.

It is important to get them moving, and you can use music to do this. You will want to create more space in your layout so that they can get up. You may also want to use more props such as plasticine and other toys or sensory accessories that they can work with to help them take in more information.

VAK stands for Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic, which are the three sensory receivers that we all use to learn. Tactile is also added sometimes, and the name is changed to VAKT.

Learners use all three modalities to learn new information and new experiences, but one of these is often dominant. It is this dominant modality that defines which way is the best for an individual to learn something.

As a rule, information should be presented using all three of these styles so that all of the learners can enjoy the benefits of greater involvement because they each have a preferred way of learning. So how can you adapt your classroom accordingly?

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